My summer

.. or at least six weeks of it, will be spent at the 2017 Jelinek Summer Workshop on Speech and Language Technology (JSALT) at CMU in Pittsburgh. As the link explains, this

… is a continuation of the Johns Hopkins University CLSP summer workshop series from 1995-2016. It consists of a two-week summer school, followed by a six-week workshop. Notable researchers and students come together to collaborate on selected research topics. The Workshop is named after the late Fred Jelinek, its former director and head of the Center for Speech and Language Processing.

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Paul Zukofsky

This strikes me as an unusual obituary: Margalit Fox, “Paul Zukofsky, Prodigy Who Became, Uneasily, a Virtuoso Violinist, Dies at 73“, NYT 6/20/2017. It massively violates the precept de mortuis nil nisi bonum, describing its subject at great length as an “automaton” who was “deeply ill at ease with world”; an “arch-bridge troll”, full of “unbridled hubris”, “disdain for those less gifted than he”, and “an ample sense of self-worth”; “swift to run to judgment”, “meanspirited, sarcastic, rather bitter”; someone who would “look at [his audience] with utter contempt”, and on and on.

Margalit Fox certainly found plenty of sources for these judgments. But this litany of bitter score-settling is completely at odds with my own experience of Paul Zukofsky.

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Faimly Lfie

When the parents are psycholinguists, the children get exposed to some weird stuff.

For example, the Stroop effect (words interfere with naming colors, e.g. GREEN RED BLUE) makes a great 4th grade science project; 9 year olds think it’s hilarious. There are lots of fun versions of the task (e.g., SKY FROG APPLE) but prudence dictates avoiding this variant in which taboo words like FUCK COCK PUSSY produced greater interference than neutral words like FLEW COST PASTA (p < .01).

Or, the kid knows that “I see that the clothes on the floor in your room have risen a couple of feet above sea level” means “clean up the mess, please” but also that this is an indirect speech act because the form of the utterance (an assertion) differs from its communicative intent (a request).  Thus enabling exchanges such as “Can you take out the garbage???”  “Is that an indirect speech act?”

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“balls have zero to me to me to me to me to me to me to me to me to”

Adrienne LaFrance, “What an AI’s Non-Human Language Actually Looks Like“, The Atlantic 6/20/2017:

Something unexpected happened recently at the Facebook Artificial Intelligence Research lab. Researchers who had been training bots to negotiate with one another realized that the bots, left to their own devices, started communicating in a non-human language.  […]

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Assari > ashali, a Japanese mimetic loanword in Taiwan

I say “in Taiwan”, because this word, 阿沙力, is both in Taiwan Mandarin, where it is pronounced āshālì, and in Taiwanese, where it is pronounced at3sa55lih3.

This is a very common expression in Taiwan, where it is used as the name of restaurants, for instant noodles, beverages, and other products, but most of all to describe someone’s personality.

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Disparaging trademarks

Supreme Court rules government can’t refuse disparaging trademarks“, ESPN:

The Supreme Court on Monday struck down part of a law that bans offensive trademarks in a ruling that is expected to help the Redskins in their legal fight over the team name.

The justices ruled that the 71-year-old trademark law barring disparaging terms infringes free speech rights.

The ruling is a victory for the Asian-American rock band called the Slants, but the case was closely watched for the impact it would have on the separate dispute involving the Washington football team.

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Investigations, hypothetical and otherwise

In an interview yesterday with Chris Wallace, did Donald Trump’s lawyer Jay Sekulow state that the president is being investigated by Robert Mueller (“Jay Sekulow on reports Bob Mueller has widened investigation“, Fox News 6/18/2017)? It certainly sounds like he did:

But Chris Wallace is frustrated to find that a few seconds later, Sekulow nevertheless asserts that he didn’t say any such thing.


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Putting the kibosh on bosh

In the “Cultural disappropriation” section of the current The Economist, there’s an entertaining and informative article on the latest attempt to purify Turkish:

Turkey’s president wants to purge Western words from its language:  A new step in Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s campaign against foreign influences”

The whole business is both humorous and hopeless:

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“As many people as not”

A reader from India, apparently not satisfied with the responses from WordReference and StackExchange, writes to express his problem with the phrase “They kill as many people as not”, found in an article by Anne Lamott (“Anne Lamott shares all that she knows: ‘Everyone is screwed up, broken, clingy, and scared’“, Salon 4/10/2015).

“As many people as __” is routine, so presumably the problem is “as not”.

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Death by french fries

The Daily Telegraph did not do much for its reputation, at least in my eyes, when it confused the defense with the prosecution after a celebrity sexual assault mistrial. Nor when it recently consulted me about whether there were grammar mistakes on a banknote, learned that there clearly were not, but went ahead and published the claim that there were anyway. Now for a sample of the Telegraph‘s science reporting, written by Adam Boult, who I suspect didn’t complete his statistics course:

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The most important word in Finnish

Of course there are many words in any language that are similarly protean. In English, try “Okay”. Or just “mm”…

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Defense counsel for the victim?

A truly Freudian slip in a story in the UK conservative newspaper the Daily Telegraph, speaking volumes about what goes wrong with so many rape and sexual assault prosecutions:

Camille Cosby, wife of the entertainer, issued a statement, read out by an associate on the court steps in a dramatically-delivered speech.

She attacked the judge as biased, and said the defence were “totally unethical.”

The defense? Andrea Constand and the other brave women who have accused Bill Cosby (they say he drugged them so he could enjoy sexual gratification without their consent) were not in the dock, and the lawyers arguing their case were not the defense team, but the prosecutors. The Telegraph journalist, Harriet Alexander, has apparently reversed the roles of the accused’s defense and the district attorney.

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Steven Bird’s new job

 

 

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