Archive for Language and science

Draconic nomenclature

Madeline K. Sofia, “‘Baby Dragon’ Found In China Is The Newest Species Of Dinosaur” (NPR, 5/9/17) clarifies the origin of Beibeilong sinensis, the newest dinosaur species:

In 1993, farmers in China found a Beibeilong embryo and eggs in Henan province. The fossils were sold to an American fossil company called The Stone Co. and brought to the United States. A model of an embryo curled inside an egg was famously featured on the May 1996 cover of National Geographic and was nicknamed “Baby Louie.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments (8)

VX in Chinese

By now practically the whole world knows that Kim Jong-nam, North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un’s older half-brother, was killed by the extremely toxic nerve agent called VX.  VX is much more potent than sarin, which was used by the Aum Shinrikyo cult to kill 12 people and injure thousands of others in the Tokyo subway in 1995.  Apparently, it’s not clear why this series of nerve agents is called “V” ( “Victory”, “Venomous”, or “Viscous” are some of the possibilities).  Since research on these agents is restricted primarily to the military, not much is known about them in civilian circles.  Whatever the “V” stands for, and besides VX, other agents in the series include VE, VG, VM, and VR.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments (12)

Will “Arrival” bring linguistics into the popular consciousness? A guest post by Luke Lindemann

The movie “Arrival” has been in theaters for three weeks now, and it has already grossed $100 million worldwide. That’s an impressive box-office draw, and it can’t all be due to linguists and their friends attending. Clearly this contemplative film, with a field linguist as the heroic protagonist, is resonating with audiences. But what does that mean for linguistics as a discipline and its perception by the public at large? Below is a guest post by Luke Lindemann, a PhD student in linguistics at Yale University who is working on the semantics of ergativity in Indo-Aryan. He is also a member of the Yale Grammatical Diversity Project, and I had the pleasure of attending a press screening of “Arrival” with Luke and a few of his colleagues from the YGDP team. The film led to some intense discussions afterwards, as I’m sure it has for linguists everywhere. (In a separate post, I’ll round up reactions from linguists since my last “Arrival” post.)

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments (21)

Chinese, Japanese, and Russian signs at Klagenfurt Botanical Gardens

Blake Shedd sent along a series of forty pictures of plant identification signs from the botanical garden in the small southern Austrian city of Klagenfurt am Wörthersee. He was rather impressed that the botanical garden staff went to the trouble of including non-Latin / non-German names for the plants.  And I was impressed at the remarkable documentation Blake provided by carefully and clearly photographing so many signs with essentially the same lighting and size.  There’s no need for him to apologize (“leaning over roped-off areas to get shots resulted in a few blurry or less than ideal shots”). The green leaves appearing at the edges of some of the photographs, which are otherwise black and white, only serve to enhance the arboreal, herbaceous atmosphere evoked by reading the signs.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments (10)

The hand of god

Article in ScienceAlert today (3/4/16):

Scientists are freaking out over a new paper that says our hands were designed by God

#Creatorgate

The article in ScienceAlert begins:

Twitter exploded today with the news that a peer-reviewed scientific paper about the human hand credits its design to “the Creator”, and scientists around the world are so furious, they called for an official retraction.

The paper, which mentions a “Creator” several times throughout, was published by the journal PLOS ONE back in January, but went largely unnoticed until James McInerney, a researcher in computational molecular evolution at the University of Manchester in UK, used twitter to call the journal “a joke”.

To say that the paper has generated an enormous amount of controversy would be an understatement.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments (58)

How English became such a dominant second language in China today

In a comment to “An orgy of code-switching” (11/6/15), I wrote:

In connection with the ABC Chinese-English dictionary database which they wanted to buy, I had some dealings with Microsoft in China about 15 years ago. Already then, their internal language in the Beijing and Shanghai offices was English. Around the same time, I also had contact with several other major companies in China where the situation was exactly the same.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments (10)

Goldensmell salt and milkfish balls

Jackie and Mimi, Toni Tan’s daughters, spotted two interesting products at the Asian supermarket near their home.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments (6)

Water control

The exoticization of Chinese, yet again

This time it’s the alleged, essential aqueousness of governance:

The Water Book by Alok Jha review – this remarkable substance“, by Rose George (5/14/15).  The first sentence:  “The Chinese symbol for ‘political order’ is made from the characters for river and dyke.”

What a lame, wrongheaded way to begin a serious article!

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments (25)

Names of the chemical elements in Chinese

Mike Pope relayed to me the following from his son Zack, a high school physics teacher:

I was wondering what the periodic table of elements looked like in China, and found this image.

This may or may not be the “official” periodic table, but I thought it was interesting to see the similarities in the characters. Specifically the character for gold, which is also the character for metal in general, and is a prefix for a large portion of the periodic table. The character for water is a large part of the character for mercury, and a few others, and all of the gas elements have the same character in them. It makes me wonder what the protocol is for naming new elements in Chinese, since they seem to be focused on the properties of the element itself, and that would take more investigating than might be possible for new elements, which usually only exist for fractions of fractions of seconds. Newly discovered elements these days are named (in English) after people: Bohrium, Rutherfordium, Fermium, Einstenium, etc. and I wonder what the Chinese equivalent of those elements is.

Read the rest of this entry »

Comments (51)