PP attachment is hard

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Alex Williams, "Creating Hipsturbia", NYT 2/15/2013:

“When we checked towns out,” Ms. Miziolek recalled, “I saw some moms out in Hastings with their kids with tattoos. A little glimmer of Williamsburg!”


Sara Rosenthal et al., "Towards Semi-Automated Annotation for Prepositional Phrase Attachment", LREC 2010; Kailash Nadh and Engineering, "A Neurocomputational Approach to Prepositional Phrase Attachment Ambiguity Resolution", Neural Computation 2012; and so on.

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6 Comments »

  1. Alex Blaze said,

    February 21, 2013 @ 12:03 am

    Young folks are all getting tattoos nowadays, and all the helicopter moms are making sure they get one as soon as possible so they aren't left out of the trend.

  2. Anarcissie said,

    February 21, 2013 @ 8:31 am

    When I first read this, I was sure Ms. Miziolek had observed (or thought she had observed) 'hipsters' with tattooed children. While I have not observed any small children with actual tattoos so far, I have seen many children with painted simulations of them.

  3. Dan Lufkin said,

    February 21, 2013 @ 11:26 am

    Just in case anyone thinks that fake tattoos for children is some new hippie phenom; back in 6th grade (~1940) I had a busy little trade in tattoos made with Mongol© colored pencils, two for a penny. I could print neatly in reverse and they looked pretty good, if I do say so myself.

  4. mgh said,

    February 21, 2013 @ 2:42 pm

    Dan, in NYC children's tattoos were all the rage among 1920s hipsters, and were called cockamamies, from the French. plus ca change…

  5. J.W. Brewer said,

    February 21, 2013 @ 7:42 pm

    Maybe there are cycles in these things. When I was a kid in the '70's, temporary tattoos for kids were (at least where I grew up) most definitely not an accepted/ubiquitous/commercialized thing, but we did have access to fake cigarettes made out of chocolate (prob the last cohort to enjoy that particular ersatz vice, at least in the US). For my kids, it's been the other way round.

  6. Meesher said,

    February 23, 2013 @ 6:04 pm

    @J.W. Brewer – I remember finding chewing gum cigarettes (in the US) in the mid-90's. You couldn't blow bubbles with it, but you could pretend to smoke it.

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