"Language Log" — a request

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As you are aware, our fans in China and elsewhere around the world would like to translate "Language Log" into their own languages.  The problem is that there are different words for "language" and "log" in the many languages that they wish to cover.

For example, the Romance languages distinguish between the faculty of language—the human capacity to communicate, using spoken or written signs—from specific oral or written natural languages (French, Mandarin, etc.). One chooses between one word or the other depending on the subject under discussion. In English, the same word can be used for both phenomena.

For the Romance languages, our friends must choose between one of the following pairs:

French: “langage” or “langue”
Spanish: “lenguaje” or “lengua”
Portuguese: “linguagem” or “língua”
Italian: ”linguaggio” or “lingua”

A similar distinction must exist in other language families as well. Given the varied interests of the LL readership, they could choose one or the other.

The same goes for "log".  There has already been some preliminary discussion in the comments to previous posts about how to render the "Log" of "Language Log" in other languages than English.  For instance, Wentao asks, "Isn't 'log' in LL a noun, as in 'captain's log', not a verb, as in 'log in'?", and then proceeds to consider various Mandarin translations, depending upon how one understands the English.

So, the floor is open.  What are your suggestions for how to render "language" and "Language Log" in your respective tongues?

Here is another set of variations for people to provide feedback on.

See also:

"Language Log logo and t-shirts" (6/2/18)

"No dictation" (6/4/18)



65 Comments »

  1. Thorin said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 6:39 am

    For Albanian I would say "ditar i gjuhës" (diary/record of language), and Arabic "sajal lugha" (سجل لغة) (language log/record). But my Arabic isn't great so I'm happy to be corrected on that.

  2. Jens B Fiederer said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 6:40 am

    Sprache Logbuch
    (German)

  3. John A. said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 6:45 am

    "Dil defteri" in Turkish also preserves the original alliteration, pleasantly enough.

  4. Francisco said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 6:46 am

    For Portuguese I would choose the free translation, "tertúlia dos linguistas", which elicits the idea of a group of linguists shooting the air after a nice dinner.

  5. Chris said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 7:11 am

    I’ve always interpreted the “log” in “Language Log” as the “log” of “[[we]b]log” (without paying any attention to what that log means). I think most languages have adopted the word “blog” directly or by transliteration, so “log” might work as-is in many languages.

    Along the same lines, you could render “Log” as 客, following 博客/播客. I don’t know about “Language”, but you could always dodge the question with “bo客”.

  6. cliff arroyo said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 7:48 am

    I'm not a native speaker but my guess for Polish might be 'Dziennik Językowy"
    For Esperanto maybe "Lingva Taglibro"

  7. Laura Morland said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 8:03 am

    I'm not a native speaker either (although living in France), and unfortunately not only would you have to choose between 'langue' and 'langage' (I would opt for the latter), but you'd have to render 'log' by a periphrasis… as is so often the case with Romance languages.

    See: http://www.wordreference.com/enfr/log :
    'carnet de bord' / 'journal de bord' / 'journal d’événements'

    Perhaps 'carnet de langage' ? With luck, a native speaker will weigh in, perhaps with something more poetic, such as @Francisco suggested for Portuguese ?

  8. Rosie Redfield said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 8:34 am

    I think part of the significance of the 'Log' in 'Language Log' is the alliteration, so the best choices for the various languages might be alliterative terms rather than the ones that most precisely capture the meaning of 'Log' in this context.

  9. cervantes said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 8:44 am

    Actually in Spanish the relevant distinction is not really between lenguaje and lengua. The word that most specifically means a particular language — e.g. English vs. Albanian — is idioma. That is a secondary meaning for lenguaje, which refers to the concept or faculty of language, linguistic style, etc. — the subject matter of linguistics. Lengua literally means tongue and so means language metaphorically just as it does in English. The word for linguistics is linguística. The word for log in the sense of a captain's log or record is diario.

    So diario de lenguaje would probably be right. In Spanish, you need the de.

  10. jpiitula said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 9:11 am

    "Kieliloki" in Finnish. Or "kieliloki" if considered a common noun.

    "Kieli" covers senses of "language" and "tongue", and "loki" is the kind of book that the captain of a ship keeps. Surely "log" in "weblog" comes from that?

    When split, add a hyphen at the compound boundary:

    kieli-
    loki

  11. Gabriel Holbrow said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 9:11 am

    There are many interesting options in Japanese (my favorite is 言葉の便り kotoba no tayori, which means, well, "language log" of course, but also has the sense of "letters about words"), but sadly the only real option is ラングエッシ・ログ ranguejji rogu.

  12. Gabriel Holbrow said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 9:13 am

    Typo correction: ラングエージ・ログ ranguejji rogu

  13. Eric said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 9:44 am

    Are you saying that in English there's no word for "language?" :)

  14. APOLLO WU said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 9:53 am

    I consider 语文记录 is an appropriate translation for Language Log, unless you like the idea of daily log, then it can be translated as 语文日志.

  15. Ambarish Sridharanarayanan said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 10:06 am

    Tamil would be something like மொழிப்பதிவேடு. Sanskrit probably or .

  16. Hans Adler said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 10:24 am

    The same problem as in Romance languages exists in German although at first sight it doesn't appear to. "Language" = "Sprache" in both senses. However, when building a compound noun starting with "Sprache", "Sprache" in the first sense (langage) is shortened to "Sprach", whereas for "Sprache" in the second sense (langue) the plural "Sprachen" is used.

    Sensible translations for "log" in this context include "Log" (which doesn't feel like a German word and would normally be replaced by "Blog") and "Protokoll". The most precise translations for "log" are "Logbuch" ("log book") and "Fahrtenbuch" ("journey book").

    Based on this, I would suggest picking one of the following German translations:

    – Sprachblog / Sprachenblog
    – Sprachprotokoll / Sprachenprotokoll
    – Sprachenbuch.

    The above order is roughly from most natural to most pretentious / most serious about avoiding English influence.

    By the way, the previous proposal "Sprache Logbuch" (which triggered this post) should not be taken seriously. This is definitely not how German compound nouns are formed. It sounds even more English than the worst marketing speak that has come out of German companies in recent years and would likely be rejected by most of the German-speaking audience of Language Log.

  17. Sagi said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 10:34 am

    For Hebrew, I would use יומן לשוני yoman leshoni. Yoman, derived from yom (day), is used both for "diary" and "log" (add in captain's log). Leshoni is "linguistic" but sounds better than using שפה safa or לשון lashon, both meaning "language" (literally, "lip" and "tongue").

  18. Victor said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 10:43 am

    I think for that for Portuguese (Brazilian), I'd suggest something more like "diário linguístico" because I think the "x dos/de y" construction sounds clunky and using "linguístico" sort of sidesteps the lingua/linguagem issue as in @Francisco's example by using the technical term for linguistics. There are lots of options for "diário" (caderno/registro/etc), but I used it because I think "tertúlia" feels weird (it's got a slightly antiquated feel to me) and perhaps as a result also sounds weird to me (less of a flow).

  19. Bob Ladd said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 11:16 am

    A contemporary Italian rendition would almost certainly include at least one English borrowing! Maybe "Linguablog"?

  20. Vilinthril said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 11:50 am

    +1 to Sprachblog for German.

    Not incidentally, that's exactly what the joint blog of three German linguists is called: http://www.sprachlog.de

  21. A said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 12:12 pm

    In the symbol language of the American West — when my husband registered the brand /LL for our cattle I told him he was honoring my favorite blog.

  22. Jens B Fiederer said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 12:17 pm

    Sorry about "Sprache Logbuch"…while I was born in Germany, making German arguably my native language, I moved to English speaking countries when I was ten years old (about 50 years ago)…so while I still speak German with my relatives every week, it is not a very cultured German. My experience with English draws me away from compound words.

  23. cliff arroyo said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 12:24 pm

    " Maybe "Linguablog"?"

    That sounds far too idiomatic – modern Italian seems to prefer using English words only in the most unidiomatic and ungraceful manner possible (preferably with meanings that are impenetrable for English speakers).

    Something like "Speak Place" or "Mouth Journal" or "Tongue Table" would be more likely.

  24. m said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 12:56 pm

    Reading both logs, I would rather keep the Kopf/Flach/Stefanowitsch ‘sprachlog’ and language log distinct.

    So, instead of keeping ‘log’ untranslated, I propose (not entirely serious) to keep ‘language’ and mistranslate ‘log’ in the piece-of-wood sense: ‘Languagescheit’ (do confuse with Langenscheidt, a german publisher of dictionaries).

  25. david said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 12:59 pm

    If we’re talking about branding (thanks A) perhaps we could call it

    LL –

  26. david said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 1:01 pm

    LL – < your lanuage rendition here >

    if this gets through the filter

  27. Michael Pratt said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 1:13 pm

    disagree with distinction that “Cervantes” draws above between “idioma” and “lengua.” For present purposes, the words are close synonyms. According to the Spanish Royal Academy’s authoritative DICCIONARIO DE LA LENGUA ESPAÑOLA, a “lengua” is a “[s]istema de comunicación verbal y casi siempre escrito, propio de una comunidad humana” (“a verbal and almost always written system of communication, proper to a human community”). The DICCIONARIO defines an “idioma” as the “[l]engua de un pueblo o nación, o común a varios” (“the language of a people or nation, or common to several of them”).

    It is the contrast between “lengua” and its close synonym “idioma” on the one side, and “lenguaje” on the other, that LL contributors must choose.

  28. SO said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 2:57 pm

    In admiration of the second half of 型録 for Jp. katarogu < catalogue I'd propose sth. involving …rogu 録, but not necessarily ランゲージ録 (rangēji roku/rogu). ;-)

  29. SO said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 3:25 pm

    Come to think of it, goroku (or gorogu? ;-) 語録 would actually be quite nice… Might also work in Chinese (yulu), Korean (eorok) etc.

  30. David Hargreaves said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 4:29 pm

    For Nepal Bhasa (Kathmandu Newar), I would propose
    भाय्या खँ bhāyyā khã: (Language talk), with the bonus that khã: can also mean "topic, concern, subject," hence "language matters"

  31. Martin said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 4:42 pm

    Cuaderno/diario de lengua/lingüístico might all be acceptable in Spanish. I prefer something a bit more idiomatic like "Apuntes del habla" or "Acerca del habla" which both preserve the alliteration (with /a/). "Log" can also be translated as "registro", so I imagine that "Registros lingüísticos" could work as well. Then there's "bitácora" which apparently strictly refers to the box in which the log is kept on a ship, but is normally used to translate "captain's log" as "bitácora del capitán". "Bitácora lingüística" has a nice ring to it, in my opinion.

  32. J.W. Brewer said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 5:58 pm

    I have no Spanish so I can't directly comment on its idiomaticity, but "bitácora" is apparently Out There as a minority-variant synonym for the loanword "blog," perhaps appealing to those who would prefer a native word. https://www.fundeu.es/consulta/bitacora-381/

  33. MV said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 8:09 pm

    For Russian I'd go for "Языколог" although it sounds like 'someone whose job is to study language', from "язык" (tongue, language) and лог ("блог" is blog), compare with "лексиколог" (lexicologist). Maybe "Языкоблог" or "Лингвоблог" (from "лингвистика", linguistics, + blog).

  34. Akito said,

    June 13, 2018 @ 11:06 pm

    "語録" has a fairly established use. It is a selection of the words and deeds of Zen masters and other religious/moral/political/etc. leaders. A recent (maybe not so recent) example is the 毛主席語録, "Quotations from Chairman Mao".

  35. Andrej Bjelaković said,

    June 14, 2018 @ 1:16 am

    For BCS it could be:

    Jezički/jezični dnevnik

    (dnevnik means diary or log as in captain's log; jezički is the Serbian version, and jezični the Croatian version; of course our word for blog is blog, so Jezički blog wouldn't be a bad translation either)

  36. ajay said,

    June 14, 2018 @ 4:49 am

    Sensible translations for "log" in this context include "Log" (which doesn't feel like a German word

    It's quite possible that it isn't; if I remember, quite a lot of maritime terminology came into German from English. The log was originally the logbook, the book in which you wrote down your log readings (and anything else that needed recording); the log readings were measurements of speed made by chucking a bit of wood (the log) overboard on the end of a line and seeing how much line it drew out in a given time (or later by using a machine that did much the same sort of thing). And German picked up the English term, das Log, rather than deriving its own word from the German for "bit of wood" (and hence das Logbuch).

    Then there's "bitácora" which apparently strictly refers to the box in which the log is kept on a ship

    And from which we get English "bittacle" or more commonly "binnacle", the waist-high structure by the ship's wheel which holds the compass, and by extension the instrument panel in a car. Just as the 19th century Germans, taking to the sea for the first time, borrowed relevant words from the maritime British, the British had earlier borrowed words from the Spanish…

  37. ajay said,

    June 14, 2018 @ 4:51 am

    "Bitácora lingüística" has a nice ring to it, in my opinion.

    "Linguistic Binnacle" has an equally nice ring.

  38. Terror Incognita said,

    June 14, 2018 @ 5:12 am

    For the Japanese, how about adding 言 gen to the front of 語録 for 言語録 gengoroku? 言語 means language in close to its English sense – 言語学 gengogaku is linguistics. So there's semantic 'language' 言語, phonetic 'log' 録 and the idiomatic 'analects' or 'sayings' 語録.

  39. Yvon Henel said,

    June 14, 2018 @ 6:15 am

    I'm no linguist but I'm certainly French and interrested in languages.

    I think that to stay very Frenchy (old style) "le carnet des langues" should be advisable.
    The modern (and still French) way could be "le blog des langues".

    The French "langage" is IMHO too specialised a word to be accurately used here.

  40. yoandri dominguez garcia said,

    June 14, 2018 @ 7:17 am

    anales de la linguística in Spanish, like saying annals of linguistics. altho i personally think language is not as good a descriptor as "meta-meta-symbols"

  41. DDOwen said,

    June 14, 2018 @ 9:43 am

    'Log Iaith' for a translation into Welsh.

  42. Andreas Johansson said,

    June 14, 2018 @ 11:58 am

    The direct translation into Swedish would be Språklogg *, but as the name of a Website it'd feel more natural to put it in the definite form: Språkloggen "The Language Log".

    * The etymological dictionary I checked doesn't have an entry for logg in the sense of "(captain's) log", but it's presumably of a piece with logg "piece of wood for measuring a ship's speed", which is indeed an English loan.

  43. BZ said,

    June 14, 2018 @ 12:10 pm

    I am not up to date on Russian technical terms, but Wikipedia tells me that log as in blog (although "blog" is often used too) is журнал or дневник (journal and diary respectively). After that, we need to decide on "language" as an adjective (языковой журнал) or as a conjugated noun (журнал языка). Neither sounds snappy enough to me, and maybe even not quite correct given that they don't seem to convey quite a broad enough meaning. My first version may suggest "made of language", while the second seems to suggest a single language more than language in general. Maybe "журнал о языке" (journal about language).

  44. Thaomas said,

    June 14, 2018 @ 12:49 pm

    In Spanish "idioma" is also an option, but I feel lenguaje is the best fit. I understand "Log" as a noun, a continuously updated record of events, so "Registro de Lenguaje" sounds OK to me.

  45. Vassili said,

    June 14, 2018 @ 4:23 pm

    Russian, nothing with "language" (язык) sounds normal enough so far. The best I could do is "записки лингвиста". "Записки" (notes) is usual/normal for the titles of scientific publications and memoirs/diaries.

  46. Alex said,

    June 14, 2018 @ 6:55 pm

    Thanks for all the replies I will summarize all the suggestions later today.

    Some suggestions are quite long. If you look at the bottom of this link you can see what it might look like

    https://jackmillscreative.wixsite.com/mingarete/languageloglogos

    Do you think we should just go for the word Language or the entire translation of language log for the ones like the Spanish.

  47. Daniele Brigadoi Cologna said,

    June 15, 2018 @ 1:59 am

    For Italian, several options tend to overlap with those proposed for other romance languaguages:
    Diario linguistico (sounds a bit bland to me)
    Appunti linguistici (still pretty dry)
    Spigolature linguistiche (a bit more fanciful)
    Il blog del linguaggio (very straightforward)
    Linguablog (sidesteps the lingua/linguaggio problem, preserves alliteration, but takes some degree of creative licence)

    I hope this helps!

  48. Daniele Brigadoi Cologna said,

    June 15, 2018 @ 2:01 am

    For Italian, several options tend to overlap with those proposed for other romance languages:
    Diario linguistico (sounds a bit bland to me)
    Appunti linguistici (still pretty dry)
    Spigolature linguistiche (a bit more fanciful)
    Il blog del linguaggio (very straightforward)
    Linguablog (sidesteps the lingua/linguaggio problem, preserves alliteration, but takes some degree of creative licence)

    I hope this helps!

  49. Alex said,

    June 15, 2018 @ 7:12 am

    Hi all please help us lock this down.

    Readers have submitted the following suggestions for translations of “Language Log”:

    Albanian
    • ditar i gjuhës (“diary/record of language”) [THORIN]
    Arabic
    • سجل لغة (transliteration: sajal lugha) (“language log/record”) [THORIN]
    Esperanto
    • "Lingva Taglibro" [Cliff Arroyo]
    Finnish
    • "Kieliloki” or kieliloki" [jpiitula]
    French
    • Carnet de langage [Laura Morland]
    • Le carnet de langues [Yves Henel]
    • Le blog de langues [Yves Henel]
    German
    • Sprachblog or Sprachenblog [Hans Adler]
    • Sprachprotokoll / Sprachenprotokoll [Hans Adler]
    • Sprachenbuch. [Hans Adler]
     Note: Vilanthril votes for “Sprachblog” and notes the existence of a website with the (slightly different) name “Sprachlog” (http://www.sprachlog.de/).
    Hebrew
    • יומן לשוני (Transliteration: yoman leshon) [Sagi]
    Italian
    • Linguablog [Bob Ladd]
    • Diario linguistico [Daniele Brigadoi Cologna]
    • Appunti linguistici [Daniele Brigadoi Cologna]
    • Spigolature linguistiche [Daniele Brigadoi Cologna]
    • Il blog del linguaggio [Daniele Brigadoi Cologna]
    • Linguablog [Daniele Brigadoi Cologna]

    Japanese
    • 言葉の便り kotoba no tayori orラングエッシ・ログ ranguejji rogu [Gabriel Holbrow]
    • 言語録 gengoroku [Terror Incognita]
    • 語録 [SO]

    Mandarin
    • 语文记录 or 语文日志 [Apollo Wu]
    Nepalese
    Nepal Bhasa
    • भाय्या खँ (transliteration: bhāyyā khã) [David Hargreaves]
    Polish
    • 'Dziennik Językowy" [Cliff Arroyo]
    Portuguese
    • tertúlia dos linguistas [Francisco]
    • diário linguístico [Victor]
    Russian
    • журнал о языке (BZ)
    Serbo-Croatian
    Croatian
    • jezični dnevnik [Andrej Bjelaković]
    Serbian
    • Jezički dnevnik [Andrej Bjelaković]
    Spanish
    • Acerca del habla [Martin]
    • Anales de la lingüística [Yoandri Domínguez García]
    • Apuntes del habla [Martin]
    • Bitácora lingüística [Martin]
    • Diario de lenguaje [Cervantes]
    • Diario del lenguaje
    • Diario lingüístico
    • Registro de Lenguaje [Thaomas]
    Swedish
    • Språkloggen [Andreas Johansson]
    Tamil
    • மொழிப்பதிவேடு [Ambarish Sridharanarayanan ]
    Turkish
    • Dil defteri [John A.]
    Welsh
    • Log Iaith [DDOwen]

    Does anyone have suggestions for translating “Language Log” into the following languages?
    • Armenian
    • Bahasa
    • Czech
    • Dutch
    • Farsi
    • Flemish
    • Irish
    • Khmer
    • Latin
    • Romanian
    • Swahili
    • Tagalog
    • Thai
    • Ukrainian
    • Vietnamese

  50. Alex said,

    June 15, 2018 @ 7:13 am

    Readers have submitted the following suggestions for translations of “Language Log”:

    Albanian
    • ditar i gjuhës (“diary/record of language”) [THORIN]
    Arabic
    • سجل لغة (transliteration: sajal lugha) (“language log/record”) [THORIN]
    Esperanto
    • "Lingva Taglibro" [Cliff Arroyo]
    Finnish
    • "Kieliloki” or kieliloki" [jpiitula]
    French
    • Carnet de langage [Laura Morland]
    • Le carnet de langues [Yves Henel]
    • Le blog de langues [Yves Henel]
    German
    • Sprachblog or Sprachenblog [Hans Adler]
    • Sprachprotokoll / Sprachenprotokoll [Hans Adler]
    • Sprachenbuch. [Hans Adler]
     Note: Vilanthril votes for “Sprachblog” and notes the existence of a website with the (slightly different) name “Sprachlog” (http://www.sprachlog.de/).
    Hebrew
    • יומן לשוני (Transliteration: yoman leshon) [Sagi]
    Italian
    • Linguablog [Bob Ladd]
    • Diario linguistico [Daniele Brigadoi Cologna]
    • Appunti linguistici [Daniele Brigadoi Cologna]
    • Spigolature linguistiche [Daniele Brigadoi Cologna]
    • Il blog del linguaggio [Daniele Brigadoi Cologna]
    • Linguablog [Daniele Brigadoi Cologna]

    Japanese
    • 言葉の便り kotoba no tayori orラングエッシ・ログ ranguejji rogu [Gabriel Holbrow]
    • 言語録 gengoroku [Terror Incognita]
    • 語録 [SO]

    Mandarin
    • 语文记录 or 语文日志 [Apollo Wu]
    Nepalese
    Nepal Bhasa
    • भाय्या खँ (transliteration: bhāyyā khã) [David Hargreaves]
    Polish
    • 'Dziennik Językowy" [Cliff Arroyo]
    Portuguese
    • tertúlia dos linguistas [Francisco]
    • diário linguístico [Victor]
    Russian
    • журнал о языке (BZ)
    Serbo-Croatian
    Croatian
    • jezični dnevnik [Andrej Bjelaković]
    Serbian
    • Jezički dnevnik [Andrej Bjelaković]
    Spanish
    • Acerca del habla [Martin]
    • Anales de la lingüística [Yoandri Domínguez García]
    • Apuntes del habla [Martin]
    • Bitácora lingüística [Martin]
    • Diario de lenguaje [Cervantes]
    • Diario del lenguaje
    • Diario lingüístico
    • Registro de Lenguaje [Thaomas]
    Swedish
    • Språkloggen [Andreas Johansson]
    Tamil
    • மொழிப்பதிவேடு [Ambarish Sridharanarayanan ]
    Turkish
    • Dil defteri [John A.]
    Welsh
    • Log Iaith [DDOwen]

    Does anyone have suggestions for translating “Language Log” into the following languages?
    • Armenian
    • Bahasa
    • Czech
    • Dutch
    • Farsi
    • Flemish
    • Irish
    • Khmer
    • Latin
    • Romanian
    • Swahili
    • Tagalog
    • Thai
    • Ukrainian
    • Vietnamese

  51. Alex said,

    June 15, 2018 @ 7:15 am

    Opps missed the Italian since it was after i cut and pasted.

    Will add in the next iteration.

    I hope everyone can provide feedback on this so we can make some shirts and to send out to people!

  52. Ondrej Vagner said,

    June 15, 2018 @ 8:00 am

    In Czech, maybe "Jazykové zápisky"? It's plural, but it sounds better than any singular translation I could come up with.

  53. Matt_M said,

    June 15, 2018 @ 9:47 am

    My Thai wife suggests บล็อคภาษา /blɔk pʰa:sa:/ — which is just a straight, idiomatic translation of "Language Blog". Another suggestion is ไดอารี่ภาษา /daiʔa:ri: pʰa:sa:/ — i.e. "language diary", which apparently sounds all right, too, if a bit "old fashioned" — but maybe that's the effect we're after with "Language Log".

  54. Jeffrey Kwong said,

    June 15, 2018 @ 9:58 am

    A play on extant compounds/terms
    典故 Quips of a literary nature
    論語 A discussion of language

  55. Andy said,

    June 15, 2018 @ 10:58 am

    For Latin I would go for 'Commentarii linguistici', assuming you don't mind that the adjective 'linguisticus' is Modern Latin -but it keeps it straightforward and concise.
    I really like 'Linguablog' for Italian, and second Ondrej Vagner's Czech suggestion. I would prefer the plural for Polish too, although 'Zapiski językowe' is already the name of someone's blog. 'Spostrzeżenia językowe', perhaps?

    @Vassili: Would 'языковые записки' not be up to snuff?

  56. corwex said,

    June 15, 2018 @ 11:31 am

    For Czech, I'd propose "Zápisky o jazyce", a slight modification of the translation suggested above. Though I have to admit I don't see any real problems with somewhat straightforward "Jazykový zápisník".

  57. Yvon Henel said,

    June 15, 2018 @ 12:08 pm

    It's me again!
    Beware, in French: `des' not `de' in both cases.

  58. Joke Kalisvaart said,

    June 15, 2018 @ 3:39 pm

    For Dutch, I suggest 'Taalblog'.

  59. Alex said,

    June 16, 2018 @ 11:45 am

    Hi All,

    Here are a few new samples,

    https://jackmillscreative.wixsite.com/mingarete/languagelogflagtees

    feedback welcome.

    Its clear the words language log is too long in some languages.

    These are with country colors

  60. Fionnbharr Ó Duinnín said,

    June 16, 2018 @ 2:25 pm

    Hungarian: Nyelvi napló ['Nyelv' means both language and tongue, as does 'dil' in Turkish.]

    Irish: Dialann teanga ['Teanga' also means both language and tongue. No alliteration, though. You could use 'Turas teanga' (language tour) which is a programme on RTE.]

  61. James Wimberley said,

    June 17, 2018 @ 8:20 am

    The Starship Enterprise keeps a captain's log. Phlebas the Phoenician may have done. The usage may well survive the recent "blog" meaning, since bloody Twitter seems to be making connected argument obsolete harrumph harrumph.

  62. SO said,

    June 17, 2018 @ 10:31 am

    @Alex: Concerning the Japanese version please note that ラングエッシ in Gabriel Holbrow's post was a typo for ラングエッジ (cf. his romanization "ranguejji"). (The most common way of rendering English "language" in Japanese seems however to be rangēji ランゲージ.)

  63. Wim Sterk said,

    June 17, 2018 @ 3:44 pm

    +1 for Dutch 'taalblog'

  64. Alex said,

    June 17, 2018 @ 6:56 pm

    @so noted

    We will make the change today and thanks!

    Will make another masterlist and more logos.

    We will test make some shirts this coming week to see how they look.

  65. Athanasios Protopapas said,

    June 18, 2018 @ 11:40 am

    For Greek I would go with γλωσσολόγιο /γloso'loʝio/ instead of a more literal multi-word rendition of "log" (φύλλο/αρχείο καταγραφής=log sheet/file) or a word that would also mean notebook (σημειωματάριο) or calendar (ημερολόγιο, as in captain's log). The proposed compound parallels the frequent translation of "blog" as ιστολόγιο (ιστός=web), thus constituting a relevant alliteration. It conflicts with obsolete usage meaning "(small) dictionary". In all, γλωσσολόγιο sounds pleasantly appropriate for this blog's title (to me, at least).

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